HAVOC HERITAGE FREE RANGE PORK

We are very excited to be working with New Zealand’s original Free Range Pig Farmers, Ian and Linda Jackson.

Here’s the Havoc Farm story so you can decide for yourself – We strongly recommend that you try their exceptional pork, at least once, before you die!

Ian has spent his life around pigs, building an exceptional level of expertise in their care and pork production. He started life in the UK, tending other people’s pigs (OPP!) eventually settling in New Zealand and with his wife Linda, in South Canterbury, farming their very own pigs and producing free range pork under the HAVOC brand.

Ian and Linda breed pigs outside in the open air where they would be free to display their natural behaviour, have plenty to eat and drink, and room to frolic at will.

In 1991, when they started out, Ian’s farming methods were considered a bit strange as it certainly wasnt the norm to farm pigs outdoors back then. Nowadays we know differently, thanks to pioneers like Ian and Linda. The locals call them Lord and Lady Havoc!

The name “Havoc’ has since become synonymous with high animal welfare in the pig industry in NZ. Someone always has to lead the way and Ian and Linda certainly set the standard for pig farming and pork production in NZ and continue to do so.

The farming policy at Havoc has always been minimal intervention, no antibiotics, and no growth promotants. The pigs are fed, amongst other goodies, rejected Mozarella from a local dairy factory.

Here’s Ian’s very own words from the Havoc website: “Ian mills his own feed on the farm and takes pride in saying “I would not feed my pigs anything I would not eat myself”. The health of the pig herd is also attributable to the fact that weaning of piglets at Havoc is very late by industry standards. It is common practice in the industry to wean as early as three weeks, but at Havoc weaning takes place sometime between week six and eight depending on the time of year and how Lord Havoc is feeling on any given day.”

Ian even takes his pigs to harvest in his own specially designed truck, known as the “Havoc Hog Hauler”. This avoids the risk of disease from stock trucks on the farm, and minimise the shock of transportation on the pigs.